Joyful Jewish

Posts Tagged ‘cardmaking

Cork apples with paint

Card made by T (aged 7)

Rosh Hashanah cards 2014

Cards made by Mum

Looking for a fun and easy Rosh Hashanah card craft? This is a variation on an activity I saw on the Challah Crumbs website.  Basically it involves printing apples using the usefully circular nature of the end of a cork.  This may be easier said than done if you don’t drink wine – or even if you do, given how much less common wine bottles with corks are these days.  It might be time to pop that bottle of champagne you’ve been saving for the right occasion. 🙂

Fortunately for me, I saved a bunch of corks some years ago with the plan of making an entire pinboard out of recycled corks.  The pinboard never eventuated, but the corks were still hanging around. (Yes, I am that sort of person who finds it hard to throw things away, how did you guess?)

Rather than keeping the corks completely round, I used a cutting blade to take out two small chunks to mimic the dimples at the top and base of an apple.  The stems are just added in pen afterwards.

Cork apple stamps

Not that you can see it clearly, but I’ve carved two dimples into each “apple”.

Corks are not uniformly flat, especially once you’ve impaled them with a corkscrew, but this adds to their charm in my opinion. I initially tested my cork stamps with ink pads, and I really liked the result.  The handwritten Hebrew letters are less of a feature, but I was making this in a rush as a demonstration model for a class of children who were not going to be critical (thankfully!)  I gave them some Hebrew alef-bet stencils and they enjoyed finding the right letters for their own cards.

Cork apples with ink

We don’t have colourful inkpads at cheder, so there we used paint.  It worked fine, but if you are doing this activity with kids then I recommend you have a scrap sheet of paper or cardboard where kids can stamp first to lose some excess paint prior to stamping their Rosh Hashanah card.  This is because if you have too much paint on the end of your cork, you end up with a blob which looks less like an apple and more like somebody stepped on a paint bug and squished it to the page.

More cork apples

The advantage of paint is that you can end up with mixed colours which look fabulous, as my daughter demonstrates above.

Cork apples

Rosh Hashanah is in less than two weeks, so I foresee more cork stamping at home this weekend!

Update: I made cards for family on the other side of the country using ink, with a stamped greeting in the middle.  I was pretty happy with how they turned out.  It’s not so obvious from this photo, but the metallic gold apples looked great.

Rosh Hashanah inked card

 

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Bar Mitzvah card

I’ve made a few Bar and Bat Mitzvah cards over the years, but I don’t always remember to scan or photograph them before I give them away.

They often feature this lovely stamp of a tallit (prayer shawl) which I purchased along with the text (which says Bar Mitzvah in Hebrew) online from Zum Gali Gali.  I like to use embossing powder and a craft heat gun for a shiny finish.  Not so many years ago I would melt embossing powder over a toaster, resulting in burned crumbs and often burned fingers as well. Thankfully those days are behind me. 🙂

If you want to make a card like this, it is very simple.

1. Stamp your design on a plain piece of card (and emboss if desired)

2. Cut one or more pieces of paper just a few millimetres wider and longer than your central piece of card, and attach the layers together with double-sided adhesive tape.  A metallic paper gives a classic finish.

3. Attach to your card.  I decorated plain blue card by stamping it with Mazel Tov (congratulations).  This stamp is one of a lovely collection I bought from Papertrey Ink a few years back. I used another design from the same set on these Chanukah cards. It’s a little bit wonky but I’m hoping that adds to the charm of a hand-made card.

 

 

 

Chanukah card pink & blue

I can’t believe it’s nearly Chanukah again already!  The Chanukah bunting and dreidel decorations are up, the cushions are out, the table runner is on display, my daughter is flipping felt latkes and leaving dreidels all over the floor while I clean up to the sound of our Chanukah compilation CD.

blue card

It’s just as well I made all these things earlier, because I started a university degree this year and study has taken away almost all of the time I used to spend crafting. So all I have to show off that is new are this year’s Chanukah cards.

gold card

After last year’s dreidel cards, I decided to use my silhouette cutter again.  I designed a chanukiah (Chanukah menorah) to cut out, and a background of Chanukah lyrics to print on the card before I cut it out.

white candle card

This means that I get two sorts of cards – one with the menorah cut out, and the other with the pieces that were removed.  It leads to lots of mix and match games involving random pieces of Japanese paper, gold foil and cellophane.  I particularly like the cellophane stained glass window effect.

rainbow card

Gluing down all the candles (in the correct order so that you can still make out the lyrics) was not so exciting, but it seemed crazy to waste them.

candles cards

Sticking one piece of colourful paper behind the menorah silhouette was a lot faster!

floral card

And here is a cross section from earlier in the week.  I’ve made quite a few more now, but need to be writing them and posting them, not just talking about them on here!

Card selection

If you receive handmade cards at Chanukah (or any other festival), here’s a tip: don’t recycle them all like you probably do with mass-produced cards.  Keep the most beautiful ones to display again in future years. Ours are blu-tacked to the wall, but I have a friend who pegs hers to the edges of her curtains.  And keep a sample of your own work to display by giving one to someone who lives in the same house as you.  (I write a card for my daughter.) It’s such a joy to look back at cards that were really made with love.

Happy Chanukah!

Inspired by Creative Jewish Mom’s dreidel mobiles, (which I made a couple of years ago) my home-made Chanukah cards are spinning dreidels!

I bought a box of coloured cards, and cut nesting dreidel shapes out of each using my wonderful Silhouette cutter.  (I created the outlines myself, thankfully you only need a couple of rectangles and a triangle to make a reasonable dreidel shape.)  Then I mixed up the colours.

To make the card, I taped a piece of white sewing thread from top to bottom of the card (inside), then taped two of the cut-out shapes to it.  The remaining two shapes I glued to the inside right of the card.  As my huband correctly pointed out, this doesn’t leave a lot of space to write a message.  But hey, it looks great!  I’ll write really small around the edge.

I found that the dreidels would often turn to reveal the plain white reverse side, so I decided to decorate them with a magen david sticker in the middle and some text around the outer shape: a homage to the traditional dreidel decoration of the Hebrew letters Nun Gimel Hey Shin which stand for the sentence Nes Gadol Hayah Sham – a great miracle happened there.

The best part of these cards is the movement – the slightest breeze makes them swirl around, and if you blow on them, they spin like crazy!

Spinning dreidel Chanukah card from Joyful Jewish on Vimeo.

I love to give and receive home-made cards. This year my Rosh Hashanah cards are a variation on papercutting – a traditional craft brought into the modern age thanks to the joy of technology.  Instead of cutting out designs by hand with a craft knife or scissors, I can send them via my computer to a machine (a Silhouette craft cutter) which accurately cuts the paper with a tiny blade, far quicker and more accurately than I could ever hope to do by hand.

After my design was cut out of white paper, I sticky-taped scraps of metallic paper (different colours and textures) behind sections of it (all except the apple outline) then used double sided tape to stick the entire thing on to green card.  The honey drop is actually a gold hologram-like paper which is very sparkly!

I can’t post the silhouette file, but here is a copy of my design you could trace around to make your own, if, like me, you were searching for Jewish designs for a Silhouette cutter.

Here’s to a sweet new year for all of us!

The pipe cleaner chanukiah is up on the front door, the bunting and dreidel mobiles are hung up inside, we’ve stocked up on new candles and a big bag of chocolate gelt… roll on Chanukah!

These are the home-made cards I’m sending out to some of my friends and family.  I love making cards and  these are simple but pretty – an embossed stamp on two colours of paper, one of which is sparkly.  And who can resist sparkliness?


It’s so much fun to make your own Rosh Hashanah cards.  This year’s design is very easy and I love the way it looks.

Materials:
– blank card
– circle of shiny yellowish paper (symbolic of honey or round challah)
– slightly larger circle of clear contact
– selection of  confetti/table scatters in the shape of apples, bees and honeycomb (or you could use other small pictures if you can’t get confetti)

Sandwich the confetti between the yellow paper and the contact.  Use the excess contact to stick the entire circle to the front of the card. Too easy!

I purchased my confetti from an Australian seller on ebay at http://stores.ebay.ca/justlovebeadsweddingaccessories


Fun crafts and activities for Jewish families with young children

A resource site for anyone who wants to share the joy of being Jewish with the children in their life.

Enjoy!