Joyful Jewish

Posts Tagged ‘Jewish fabric

Rosh Hashanah skirt

Last year I decorated a t-shirt for my daughter for Rosh Hashanah.   She was very happy with it, but it didn’t match anything she already owned.  So I promised her that this year I would make her a matching skirt.

Let’s just say that the last 12 months has gone really fast! Rosh Hashanah was looming on the horizon and I still hadn’t gone shopping for a skirt pattern.  So I took advantage of the fact that (a) my daughter is young enough to appreciate anything I sew for her  (b) I have a stash of groovy fabric (as seen in my Rosh Hashanah challah cover) and (c) the internet is full of useful sewing blogs explaining how even people like me – with very limited sewing skills – can still easily rustle up a fun skirt.

Rosh Hashanah skirt on model

It’s loud, it’s proud, and my daughter loves it.  Maybe next year I should make my husband a matching kippah?

 

Advertisements

Finished product

After seeing the fabrics I purchased to make my Rosh Hashanah challah cover, my daughter asked for a Rosh Hashanah t-shirt.  This design was very quick and easy to make.

Step 1: Cut a circle or two semi circles of honey-ish fabric using double sided iron-on adhesive. (Anyone can be good at applique with this stuff – it’s fantastic!)  I just drew around a plate to make my circle.  Iron on to a plain t-shirt, and zig-zag stitch around the edge(s).

Step1 Honey

In case you’re wondering, purple has no connection to Rosh Hashanah as far as I am aware, it just happened that we had a plain purple t-shirt in the house and that saved me a trip to the shops. 🙂

Step 2: Find a picture of an apple on the internet (or draw your own) and use that to apply a fabric apple in a similar fashion.

Step2 apple

Step 3: add a stem and leaf in the same way.

Step 3 details

That is all there is to it! It’s a really fast project (assuming you have a stash of suitable fabric and some iron-on adhesive!)

End result? One very happy daughter, who has subsequently worn her new t-shirt at every available opportunity!

On the model

If you like this, you might also like to see the t-shirt I made her for Pesach.

Finished challah cover

New Year is just around the corner, and I have been very busy in the lead up this year!

Following on from my earlier Chanukah and family handprint challah covers, I have now made one for Rosh Hashanah.  (I think I’ll be taking a break from challah covers for a while now!)  As Rosh Hashanah challah is round, so so is this cover, and the fabrics depict or represent apples and honey, two traditional sweet foods eaten for the new year.

Fabrics2

Fabrics1

I don’t have much patchwork experience and I wanted something simple (read: foolproof) so I found a very easy looking idea on the internet: a circle made by sewing triangles together.  I made a template out of cardboard, just a triangle with a 30 degree point.  12 “slices” x 30 degrees = 360 degrees aka a full circle. By cutting the point of each triangle off before sewing them together, I didn’t need to worry whether or not the points would meet up neatly.

Construction phase1

As you can see, it is not particularly circular at the edge, but you cut it back later.  (Make sure you cut your fabric larger than you think you’ll need so that it’s not too small when you trim and hem it.)  Alternatively, you might be smart enough to cut the template with the right curve built in – but I was sticking with simple!

Next I appliqued a circle to go in the centre and cover that hole.  I printed off the text for L’Shanah Tovah (literally “for a good year”) using a font called Frank Ruehl and traced around it to put the outline onto double sided iron-on adhesive.  A fair degree of fiddly cutting out and ironing on later, it looked like this:

Construction phase2

I used a bit more iron-on adhesive to stick the circle in the right place. Then it was just a case of stitching around the edges to make sure nothing falls off, EVER, and including a few beads for decorative effect.

Edging detail

Finally, I cut a circle of fabric for the back, trimmed the front to match, sewed the two faces together (you get the general idea…).  Next job, relocating that really good Rosh Hashanah challah recipe I used last year.

I wish you and your loved ones L’Shanah Tovah – may you be inscribed in the book of life for a sweet and blessed year.

Closer view of challah cover

Cushion detail

This was a very spur-of-the-moment idea.  A friend asked me to bring some cushions for kids to sit on while they listened to Chanukah stories.  I was going to fetch a few out of the attic – we have a stash we keep specifically to recline on at Pesach – when I noticed a neighbour was throwing out 4 plain blue cushions.  Always happy to recycle, I collected them, washed them, and decided to add some easy applique.

Nun gimel

Actually I mentally ran through a bunch of possible decorating ideas before going with what seemed most foolproof!  I printed off outline Hebrew letters in the largest font possible (999pt, in case you were wondering) to use as a template, then used heat-n-bond (something I have only recently discovered, but LOVE) to iron the resulting letters onto a square of co-ordinating fabric, and then sewed that to each cushion cover.  The zig-zag stitching is not perfect, but it does the job and the whole project was done in a couple of hours.

Hey shin

We’ll be dedicating these cushions to the comfort of dreidel spinners’ tucheses for years to come!

This is part one of the story of two chanukiot (chanukah menorahs).  I really wanted to sew a wall hanging of a chanukiah, so I designed a lovely nine-branched menorah on graph paper and scaled it up.

This is how it started.

As will become apparent later, this design turned out to be the wrong size for my planned wall hanging – but I still liked it.  So I decided to make it into something smaller: a challah cover.  Yes I know they usually have a Shabbat theme, for obvious reasons, but I have plans for a number of festival themed covers so we can change them over as we move through the year.

In my haste to get the project underway, I cut out the menorah from a lovely teal blue/gold fabric which, I discoved later that day, clashed with every other piece of fabric I had intended to cut the candles from.  I was about to throw it out and start again when my husband said “that would look great with red”.

I’m not sure that anyone else has ever used red chanukah candles, but when we lived in the UK a decade ago, nowhere near a Judaica shop and well before it became easy to buy anything and everything over the internet, we used to buy candles that were perfectly sized for our chanukiah from our local Asian food shop.  They were very good quality, and they were red, a symbol of good fortune in their country of origin.  In the end, the whole project had quite an oriental flair to it, with the dramatic use of dark colours – a striking contrast to our existing white challah cover!

This is my first effort at a hand appliqued project.  My stitching was a little variable, but I enjoyed incorporating some beads for the wicks and around the candlelight.  And here is the finished product!

Click for larger picture!

Now, back to the wall hanging…

I finished this just in time for Chanukah! I am really happy with how it turned out.

Happy Chanukah everyone!

After the success of my Pesach placemats, I thought I would try and sew something else for my home.

Using a mixture of Jewish prints and co-ordinating material from my stash,  I made some bunting to hang up for Chanukah.   My daughter absolutely loves it, and I’m sure it will get a lot of use in the years to come.

If you’d like to do something similar, you can find plenty of tutorials on the internet.  I used these ones.

How to make bunting: http://www.myhomemadehappy.com/?p=54

I followed these instructions pretty closely, apart from not cutting two pieces of fabric at the same time.  I found it easiest to use a single chopstick to make the point of each pennant (triangle).  And I sewed strips of velcro at each end so I can open and close the loops.

My biggest challenge was making my own bias binding for the first time.  I used the instructions from here: http://modernquiltlove.wordpress.com/2009/04/30/how-to-make-continuous-bias-binding/

This references another site: http://pir8.freeservers.com/quilting/CBT/

Then there was an a-ha moment when I discovered I could get it all to fold up perfectly by threading a pin into the cover of my ironing board: http://creativelittledaisy.typepad.com/creative_little_daisy/2007/11/diy-version-of.html

Thanks to these sites, I successfully made what I needed, and half a metre of 110cm wide fabric was successfully transformed into nearly 11 metres of bias binding.  The worst part was ironing it all!

Then it was just a case of pinning it all together and letting the sewing machine do the rest.

Unfortunately some of my menorahs are upside down – but I didn’t want to waste fabric by not using them, and if the bunting is against a wall then you will only see them right side up.

It feels like a party with this strung up in my home!  I made three separate lengths, each about 3.5 metres long (20-23 pennants).  Roll on Chanukah!!


Fun crafts and activities for Jewish families with young children

A resource site for anyone who wants to share the joy of being Jewish with the children in their life.

Enjoy!